skip to Main Content

Submitted by: Jim Tanner

Aeoniums originate from northern Africa and islands close by. They produce succulent rosettes of waxy leaves, generally at the end of naked stems. Depending on the plant, and the species, the leaves can have attractive variegations.
Each rosette die after blooming and setting seeds. In some species, since the plants do not produce any offsets or side rosettes, it will die completely after blooming. These species are propagated by seeds.
Most species are fall and spring growers, and should be watered and fed regularly at these periods. Fall is also a good time for rooting cuttings. When the plants are getting older, it is often a good idea to cut and replant the terminal rosettes to prevent legginess. This has the added benefit of preventing the plant from reaching the size at which it will bloom.

Aeonium arboreum
Aeonium arboreum
Aeonium 'Compton Carousel' Variegated
Aeonium 'Compton Carousel' Variegated
Aeonium davidbramwellii
Aeonium davidbramwellii
Aeonium haworthii f. variegata
Aeonium haworthii f. variegata
Aeonium leucoblepharum
Aeonium leucoblepharum
Aeonium lindleyi in flower
Aeonium lindleyi in flower
Aeonium pseudotabuliforme
Aeonium pseudotabuliforme
Aeonium pseudourbicum
Aeonium pseudourbicum
Aeonium sedifolium
Aeonium sedifolium
Aeonium simsii
Aeonium simsii
Aeonium spathulatum
Aeonium spathulatum
Aeonium 'Sunburst'
Aeonium 'Sunburst'
Aeonium tabuliforme
Aeonium tabuliforme
Aeonium urbicum
Aeonium urbicum
Aeonium 'Zwartkop'
Aeonium 'Zwartkop'

Greenovia is a small genus very closely related to Aeonium. Greenovias are native from the Canary Islands where they grow in the hills between 500 and 7500 feet elevation (150 to 2300 m). They grow on dry volcanic slopes, sometimes in the shade. Their leaves form succulent rosettes that close during periods of drought. They occasionally have a short stem.
The greenovias bloom in the spring. They have yellow flowers and most species die after blooming.
Propagation is by seeds, offset for the plants that produce them, or leaf cuttings that are supposed to be tricky.

Greenovia aizoon
Greenovia aizoon
Greenovia aurea
Greenovia aurea
Greenovia diplocycla
Greenovia diplocycla
Greenovia dodrentalis
Greenovia dodrentalis

LATIN LOOKUP – Loquerisne Latine (Do you speak Latin)?

The meanings of latin plant names on this page – from http://davesgarden.com/guides/botanary/

  • Aeonium [ee-OH-nee-um]
    An ancient name used by Dioscorides for one of the species in the genus.
  • aizoon [AY-zoon]
    Evergreen.
  • arboreum [ar-BOR-ee-um]
    Tree-like.
  • aurea [AW-re-uh]
    Golden flower.
  • davidbramwellii [day-vid-bram-WEL-ee-eye]
    For 20th century British botanist Dr. David Bramwell.
  • diplocycla [dy-plo-SY-kla]
    From the Greek diploos (double) and cyclos (circular, wheel).
  • Greenovia [green-OH-vee-uh]
    Named for 19th century English geologist George Bellas Greenough.
  • haworthii [hay-WOR-thee-eye]
    Named for Adrian Hardy Haworth, 19th century British botanist.
  • leucoblepharum [loo-koh-BLEF-ah-rum]
    From the Greek leukos (white) and blepharis (eyelash); for the thin white leaf margins.
  • lindleyi [LIND-lee-eye]
    Named for John Lindley, 18th century British botanist and taxonomist; professor of botany in London University.
  • sedifolium [sed-ih-FOH-lee-um]
    With fleshy foliage.
  • simsii [SIM-see-eye]
    For 19th century British physician and botanist Dr. John Sims.
  • spathulatum [spath-yoo-LAY-tum]
    With a small spathe.
  • tabuliforme [tab-yoo-LEE-form-ee]
    Formed like a tablet, flat shaped; also spelled tabulaeforme.
  • urbicum [UR-bee-kum]
    Urban (belonging to cities or towns).
  • variegata [var-ee-GAY-tuh]
    Variegated.
Back To Top